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Audience: Sys Admins
Last Updated: 7/19/2015 7:42:40 PM
**All times are EST**





Windows Server 2008 Clustering Configuration

By Erik Rodriguez

Tags: Windows 2008 server cluster, Server 2008 clustering setup, Microsoft clustering setup, Windows 2008 cluster node

This article provides a the process of configuration a failover cluster in Windows Server 2008.

Problem

You would like a cluster of servers that will "failover" if the primary one fails.

Prerequisites

Using Windows Server 2008 the following prereqs must be met:
  1. The servers must be running Windows Server 2008 Enterprise.
  2. MPIO must be installed.
  3. Ensure that the disks (LUNs) that you want to use in the cluster are presented to the servers that you will cluster. The following is a list for disks (LUNs), their size, and their respective names that will need to be presented to all nodes in the cluster you're creating:
    1. 1GB Quorum Drive - SERVER CLUSTER NAMEQuorum (Q:)
  1. Ensure that you have readily available the following Physical and Virtual Name along with their corresponding IP addresses, so they can be entered in when prompted.
    1. Cluster Server Name
    2. Cluster Server IP
    3. Cluster Name Node 1
    4. Cluster Node 1 IP
    5. Cluster Name Node 2
    6. Cluster Node 2 IP

Installing the Failover Cluster Role

  • Click Start, click Control Panel.
  • Under Programs, click on Turn Windows features on or off.
  • In Server Manager, under Features Summary, click Add Features.
  • In the Add Features Wizard, click Failover Clustering, click Next, and then click Install.
  • Follow the instructions in the wizard to complete the installation of the feature. When the wizard finishes, close it.
  • Repeat the process for each server that you want to include in the cluster.

Validation

  1. To open the failover cluster snap-in, click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Failover Cluster Management.
  2. Confirm that Failover Cluster Management is selected and then, in the center pane under Management, click Validate a Configuration.
  3. Follow the instructions in the wizard to specify the two servers and the tests, and then run the tests. To fully validate your configuration, run all tests before creating a cluster.
  4. The Summary page appears after the tests run. To view Help topics that will help you interpret the results, click More about cluster validation tests.
  5. While still on the Summary page, click View Report and read the test results. To view the results of the tests after you close the wizard, see SystemRoot\Cluster\Reports\Validation Report date and time.html where SystemRoot is the folder in which the operating system is installed (for example, C:\Windows).
  6. As necessary, make changes in the configuration and rerun the tests.
  7. To view Help topics about cluster validation after you close the wizard, in Failover Cluster Management, click Help, click Help Topics, click the Contents tab, expand the contents for the failover cluster Help, and click Validating a Failover Cluster Configuration.

Create Cluster Wizard

  1. To open the failover cluster snap-in, click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Failover Cluster Management.
  2. Confirm that Failover Cluster Management is selected and then, in the center pane under Management, click Create a cluster.
  3. Follow the instructions in the wizard to specify:
    1. The servers to include in the cluster.
    2. The name of the cluster.
    3. Any IP address information that is not automatically supplied by your DHCP settings.
  4. After the wizard runs and the Summary page appears, to view a report of the tasks the wizard performed, click View Report.




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